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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
appealed to him, and they didn't now. finding neither subjects nor an artistic environment that suited him, he left london and traveled 275 miles to the north. he settled in the small fishing village of cullercoats on the north sea and rented a studio two houses from the rescue station, overlooking the beach. here was his first encounter with the wild and elemental forces of nature. the rhythm of life in cullercoats was determined by the fishing boats, which set out at dusk and returned in the morning. gradually, homer began to replace descriptive detail with the concentrated drama of individuals bent on the task of survival in a rugged environment. although he had intended to stay in cullercoats only for the summer, he remained almost two years. in october, he watched the life brigade rescue the crew of a wrecked ship-- the iron crown. he sketched the scene from the beach and later painted one of his largest and most ambitious watercolors. at cullercoats, homer's works took on a new monumentality. in the lives of the fisherwomen, he perceived both the gravity of the human condition and th
been laid off of work. as a city, we need to do much better at creating an environment where we have more jobs and economic development. we are also extremely challenge in our public transit. we talk about being a transit first city, but everyone has had the experience of sitting in gridlock, waiting for the bus, trying to hail that tab, walking on pedestrian sidewalks that are not particularly safe. as a city, we need to do more to invest in the first-class transportation system. >> what are some of the biggest issues facing your district? >> in addition to the local economy that impacts the merchant corridors, to many vacant storefronts, transit issues, in every neighborhood we're having a real conversation about how we change, whether we should preserve aspects of the important characters of our neighborhood or think about building new things. there is also a real discussion we're having in many neighborhoods about affordability. i hear from too many tenants in the process of being evicted, homeowners being foreclosed on. we need to think about how all of us can continue to live i
in this new environment that we find ourselves in post-election and particularly with respect to the susan rice piece which is -- ha, gender, all these little sexy pieces to it, how do republicans that you're hearing see that? >> it's interesting. i was talking amazingly to more democrats yesterday. they said we just want to have a fight on the floor. we just don't want to have this thing where you can stick something and say i've got a hold on it and nothing happens. we want the american people to have to actually watch. if they don't want susan rice, let them stand on the floor and actually have to talk about it so that the world will see it. and then the people can judge. but it's not like that now. you just stick something in a closet. >> so what's the possibility of their actually being filibuster reform? this comes up after every election cycle. what's so special about now that makes it possible that the republicans and democrats will come together and do this? >> i think there's so much pressure on harry reid to do something. he can do it by himself with his own party's votes. if he
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
for improvement and identifies the funding environments. amtrak ridership set a record last year as they indicated. and with an aging population higher gasoline prices and the total instability of the fuel resources, highway and aviation congestion, millions of more travelers choose to ride the train if the service is available and dependent. amtrak workers are prepared and well trained to provide services to our customers, but for us to succeed congress must provide amtrak with consistent and predictable multiyear funding for modernization and capacity upgrades. beyond reorganization, what amtrak really needs is dramatic increases in capital investments. amtrak's next generation plans for the northeast corner is outstanding. it will cut the transaction it time in half between washington and new york, as well as between new york and boston. they need to increase speed and updecorate the infrastructure is the ticket to transporting americans in an cost effective and energy efficient matter. we and labor are ak -- amtrak's partner. we -- if they so see the need but more importantly, the substantial
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. shareable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid incredible 4g lte by htc for $49.99. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. so i never missed a beat. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> voters in nevada appear to keep an open mind. take for example lance gilman, the owner of the infamous or just famous mustang ranch brothel. the first brothel owner to win public office in nevada since prostitution was legalized. but voters didn't think twice about electing him. he won the november 6th election with 62% of the vote. commissioner lance gilman joins me now from reno, the biggest little city in the world in nevada. listen, thank you for joining us. >> it's a pleasure, don. i've been a fan of yours for a long time. it's a real pleasure to be with you here tonight. >> thank you very much. i have to say, the most b
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. as far as the environment energy, it's an absolute winner. but we have to do it with the least amount of subsidy and god forbid there should be a prophet in operations that we could actually achieve that if we work together. so let's take the report together. first of all, the board of directors had organizational problems from very top of the board. i was very pleased for sitting this hearing and i ask questions before. we went to a nine-member board and seven members of the board had been appointed. two democrat appointees were lacking until yesterday the white house admitted these two and i'm pleased to see that and i hope everyone helps get the full complement of the board in place. sometimes it takes a hearing to get action under its implementation of a strategic plan for highlighting that the board should be filled. and maybe they did that at their own volition, but i'm very pleased that it was done. let's look at the key folks in place and you divided into six divisions. i'm very pleased to hear what she said about possibly not going forward with some of the commuter activities
term? we're trying to provide for the palestinians much better economic environments. if you take for example in gaza strip, until the last year, economic growth was about 15 or 16% in gaza strip. thanks to our efforts, you must understand that in the last three months, we pay the salary for mahmoud abbas. i think the key is economic development. what is the real mistake? my problem with the western view of this process. you think it is possible to impose peace. >> when you are thinking about this, you think of a palestinian state. >> first of all, security. second, prosperity. from a result of security and prosperity, we will achieve peace. gdp per capita of $10,000. if they achieve this, we will resolve all our problems without special envoys, without the u.n. the key today is to develop their economy because the main reason is the unemployment. >> but it is going to be a question in this city. in the second obama administration, how much effort should the united states put into advancing an effort that you regard as fruitless and not even relevant to progress in the region? sho
begin with feeding america, maggie? because america's food environment has so many -- is laden with problems. >> one in five children in 50 million food impoverished americans, 1 in 5 are children. i think this news really struck howard buffett by surprise in his own hometown of decatur. i think two-thirds of the high school students are taking free lunches. and that, he said, was in a town where food processing is its home. >> exactly. >> and he basically decided, this is a problem we can fix. as he says in the piece, he wants to put hunger in america out of business, which does sound a lot like his dad. >> hard to do because you have to also look at the food and how it's made and the processing is such a part of the problem because you can have a hungry child who's also obese. and it doesn't make sense, but when you look at the way food is prepared and what is fed to these children when they can eat, it's not a good option for them. >> it's not, but you know, howard says, too, that there's no shortage of food, good produce food, in america that farmers either don't farm or ha
:30 eastern. on c-span3, the senate environment and public works committee will hear about the impact of hurricane sandy from members of congress from areas hit by the storm. later the house oversight and government reform committee will hear on the government's response to the rising autism rate. that is also on c-span3 at 2:00 eastern. >> on 16 or 17 bases in the united states we have military runs. the average cost to educated child in that school is $50,000. almost four times what rest of public education costs. the vast majority used public schools. we could take the money we're spending today and pay every school system 14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year and with the same or better outcomes. >> you can talk to oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's in death. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt bomb. join our three our conversation, your calls, e-mails, tweets, for senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span
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and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> dolphins. playful, smart, friendly. why would anyone want to shoot and kill them? that's a question investigators are asking after at least six dolphins were tortured and killed along the northern gulf coast. ed lavandera reports on the search now for those responsible. >> reporter: to reach the crime scenes, you need to catch a ride and take a guide. this island we see off to the left is deer island where you found two of them? >> that's correct. >> reporter: a harrison county, mississippi, sheriff's helicopter and the lead biologist of the institute for marine mammal studies took us to the sight where the murdered dolphins have emerged along the mississippi gulf coast. how many dolphins turned up killed so far? >> about six or seven. we know that at least three or four of them were killed with bullets and that the other ones have been mutilated. some with their tails cut off, jaws cut off or a screwdriver in them. >> reporter: the doctor performed the necropcies. what does that tell you? >> i think it's a sick ritual of some sort. >> repor
the information back. it is a little inefficient but it makes for a much happier work environment. >> how many hours are there in a mars day? >> 24 hours and 40 minutes. >> bill: so then you have to calculate that. >> what happens is your day starts 40 minutes later and it gets weird when it gets like 2:00 in the morning. >> bill: all right now we want to talk about mars. first, i have to ask you about the earlier in the week, maybe it was last week, i guess announcement dr. begel about finding ice on the polar caps of mercury. i don't get this. this is the hottest of the planets, is it not? and why do they have ice and why is our ice melting? is there something wrong with this picture? >> no, it's not. it is also one of the coldest planets because one side is almost always toward the sun. one side is always in space. you've got this dichotomy of a really hot surface and a really cold surface. >> bill: it doesn't rotate? >> it rotates about once every 90 days so one side is able to cool off very quickly because it is radi
and that's what you get in living in newark, new jersey, in an urban environment where the food is not particularly cheap is tough. you're right, they're not paying for every meal and calorie he's ingesting but that's not much food. >> what's part of that discussion a twitter conversation where somebody said the state shouldn't be responsible for nutrition, right? and because part of the problem here is that people who are food stamps don't have access to really healthy food. you see cory booker made his, you know, best attempt at getting healthy food, frozen vegetables, canned beans and things like that. that is part of the problem with nutrition and poverty stricken areas. >> and that amount. we have to take a short break. >> [ inaudible ]. >> still ahead -- >> have a job, son. >> you do. i'm going to check you. >> "the new york post" and its photographer taking heat over the cover photo of a man taking minutes before his death he was crushed by the train. did the paper cross the line in publishing that picture. we'll talk about that coming up. lashawn's got her christmas list
there and getting that business to a level of sustainability given the very competitive environment. and in asia-pacific, it's all about all the seeds we've planted in terms of investments and plants and products, those are going to bear a lot of fruit in terms of volumes and revenues as we grow that business going forward. >> we've done probably five of six interviews, not just the auto market, but the economy as a whole, and seems like the same question over and over, are you seeing stability? and any time i talk with you or other auto executives, yes, we think we're seeing stabilization. do you have confidence that europe has stabilized? >> i can't give you 100% pure confidence. we're seeing some encouraging signals even in the last couple of days in terms of some of the sovereign debt issues they're trying to resolve. but our approach there is -- as you know, we've announced a transformation plan there, it's about investing in products. but at the same time, work on the cost side and that's why we've made announcements around some equipment changes. >> real quick, here in the u.s., consumer
as the environment, energy, it's an absolute winner, but we have to do it with the least amount of subsidy and god forbid there should be a profit in some of these operations, but i think we could actually achieve that if we work together. so let's take the report together. first of all, the board of directors, in pria we had organizational problems from very top of the board. i asked the question before. we went to a nine-member board and seven members of the board had been appointed, two democrat appointees were lacking. yesterday, i'm told -- yesterday the white house submitted these two nominees. i'm pleased to see that and i hope the senate acts with due speed and get the folks aboard and in place. sometimes it takes a hearing to get action. whether it's implementation of a strategic plan or highlighting that the board should be filled. maybe they did that of their own volition but i'm very pleased that it was done. all right. let's look at the key folks in place, and you divided it into six divisions. i'm very pleased of what you said about possibly not going forward with the commuter activi
always on the eye of creating an environment where businesses can grow and provide great jobs and great careers going forward. i think that's the most important thing is to stay focused on what the job is at hand. >> and anything about the cup holders? >> well, you can have big cups or small cups. >> what else do you have in the car, though? internal, people like gadgets now. do they have the maps and everything like that? >> we have my lincoln touch system which is really the latest and greatest in human machine interfaces, it's really nice. you can command the vehicle with your voice. and you can do it with the swipe of your finger, of course. but probably the neat thing we have is a new push button transmission. and instead of your traditional shifter -- >> it if you're chrysler -- >> push, drive or reverse. what's neat about it, it freed up the instrument panel, the center console to be really beautiful now. because we don't have that big, clunky, shift mechanism. i think you'll find some new things. >> does it have a great democratic name? postmaster general from the '30s and '40s?
of the nfl, the players association and pro-football and the industry in general and creating an environment that is productive? aspen begin to address these questions at the aspen ideas festival in june where we convened a panel called head games, can foot all save itself from itself and jim brown, the nfl legendary, the legendary nfl running back was on the panel and dan garza, professor at stanford who has worked on mouthguard technology that can measure the force of impacts on the head and kevin turner who was the subject of documentary which you will see a clip of it called american man produced by a colleague of mine who works at hbo. so, this panel will be featured in a show on the world channel on november 20 at 8:00 p.m. and on line as well. pbs is working with, public television is working with the aspen institute to turn this into a one-hour session. there will be a whole one-hour session which will include conversations about football safety but we are going to play about a ten-minute clip of that. [no audio] [inaudible conversations] let's come back to it. sorry about that. so w
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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